Difference between user stories and tasks

'Matrioskes' by Miquel Bohigas Costabella Though they sound similar in a functional manner, user stories and tasks are quite different aspects of agile methodology. Still, many of us use the terms user story and tasks interchangeably. Not only this causes confusion, but also keeps you from reaping the full benefits of your agile work culture. Until and unless you clearly know the terms and their meanings, you will not be able to follow the best practices. So, let’s try to clearly understand the difference between user stories and tasks.

[Continue reading →]

Priority and severity: What’s the difference?

stone and pen Filing bugs is a mundane task - everyone does it, from developers to testers, and sometimes even the end users. But many of us don’t understand one of the most important concepts while filing a bug, the difference between priority and severity. While some use these terms interchangeably, others use them with opposite meaning. Let us today clear the misconceptions about these two terms, so that teams can make the full use of their bug management tools.

[Continue reading →]

You helped us win the best agile tool 2015 award

Taiga&Kaleidos Team with superpowers I am writing this post at 39.000 feet on my way back from London to Madrid. Yesterday was a great day for Taiga but most importantly, we had so much fun! So there is this thing called Agile Awards in the UK. It has been going on for 7-8 years now and the different categories acknowledge various aspects of the Agile movement. Projects, people, initiatives... and for the first time this year, they added the Best Agile Tool award.

[Continue reading →]

Personal Kanban using Taiga

'Grey Felt Journal TO DO LIST on a white desk' by Karolina Grabowska One of the best productivity hacks is to always keep a to-do list handy. This helps you keep a track of what needs to be done and what is accomplished. As it may sound very simple, almost all of us have struggled while trying to keep a to-do list updated and keeping ourselves on track to follow the list. We either get too busy and forget to update the list itself or take it too casually to stay on course and finish the tasks on the list. Either way, this is a failure. So, what is the solution?

[Continue reading →]

Manage your remote team well with these 4 simple tips

Working outside Remote working is one of the biggest advantages of this cloud era - facilitated by cloud based infrastructure and the high internet penetration, more and more people are opting to working remotely. Rightly so, as an employee you get to see your family more, get to work in an environment you create yourself, 100% cut on office travel time and expenses - the list is long. Remote work has advantages for employers too - no real estate costs, no hardware, infrastructure costs and increased employee productivity!

[Continue reading →]

GitHub: A beginner's guide, Part II

'The Github Kegerator' by Tim Lucas This is the second post in the series on GitHub: A beginner’s guide. In the previous post we learnt about Git basics and some of its most important commands. Now, we will take a look at steps to create your own repo on a Linux box (with the master on GitHub). I assume you already have your GitHub account and a repo created. If not, you can do that using the steps mentioned here. Note that if you are on Mac or Windows machines, GitHub has desktop applications for both. After you download the desktop application, you can push code to your repo using the steps mentioned here. But if you are on a Linux box, you will need to install Git and then configure it to use your GitHub repo.

[Continue reading →]

GitHub: A beginner's guide, Part I

'GitHub office' by Dave Fayram Today GitHub is world’s favorite place to host code - whether your software is open source or proprietary, you can host it on GitHub, choose who gets to see and contribute to your repository and be rest assured that you will have access to your software anytime anywhere. And why only code, you can even host and collaborate on other stuff like text files with GitHub. But, to the uninitiated, this looks like a huge maze with so many commands. There is also the obvious fear of doing something wrong and screwing everything up (more so because of there are others watching). In this two article series, lets take a close look at various GitHub features and when to use them in real world scenarios.

[Continue reading →]